The Harlem African Burial Ground Task Force is a group of concerned citizens who have united to help the Elmendorf Reformed Church to restore and memorialize its historically and culturally significant colonial African burial ground at 1st Avenue, between 126th and 127th Streets in East Harlem, New York City.

THREE GENERATIONS OF ONE FAMILY

IN THE

The family tree depicted below traces the lineage of three generations of the family of Phoebe Tamar, an African American woman who, along with several members of her family, is buried in the Harlem African Burial Ground. Her parents, Herman and Jane, form the roots of this family tree; and her children from two marriages form its canopy. As you move down the family tree please note that the following symbol         indicates that that particular family member is buried in the Harlem African Burial Ground.

Henry Blake was Phoebe Tamar’s first husband. He was baptized as an adult when he was ill on the same day that the couple's new little baby Richard, also ill, was baptized. Both Henry and the little baby died almost immediately afterwards.

Phoebe Tamar's second husband was Aretas Hagerman. He too, at Phoebe Tamar's insistence, was baptized as an adult and at his death was buried in the Harlem African Burial Ground. Altogether, Phoebe Tamar buried both of her parents, both of her husbands and three of her nine children in the Harlem African Burial Ground before she herself was buried there in 1856.

THE ARCHIVAL RECORDS

The family tree above was created using information from the archival records of St. Michael's Church (located on 99th Street and Amsterdam Avenue) and St. Mary's Church (located on 126th Street between Amsterdam and Broadway Avenues). These records do not reveal every detail regarding birth, baptism, marriage or death, but they do provide sufficient information for historians to form a complete picture of familial relationships. The slideshow below presents images of the actual archival records. 

Record of Phoebe Tamar’s First Marriage to Henry Blake. (Photo, Anthony Carrion).

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